STAR HUSTLER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR HUSTLER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take a months worth of STAR HUSTLER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc.


As of this date, 1/24/97, Telstar 401, our regular satellite, is not functioning.

 

PBS has made temporary feed arrangements for this month's feed.

Monday January 27 9:30 - 10:00 AM EST

Telstar 402 Transponder 7-Upper Channel 1

 

For non-digital receivers use:

Telstar 402 Transponder 24 Frequency 11,923

 

Additional feed dates and satellite info will be provided when we get them.





Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR HUSTLER. Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR HUSTLER Episode #393-I


1000th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 2/3/97 through Sunday 2/9/97

"A Star Hustler Milestone, Closest New Moon of '97
and A Super Planet Parade"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings, fellow star gazers, and have we ever got a week and a half for you. And even though one of the events may be very difficult to see, and occurs early this week, nevertheless I feel it's extremely important that some of you attempt to find an outrageously close pairing of the two brightest planets on Wednesday morning, February 5th. Simply go outside about 20 minutes before sunrise and face East where you will see a lovely crescent moon and planet Mercury just below it. And if you have a clear, absolutely flat horizon you may be lucky enough to catch Jupiter and Venus side by side separated by only 3/10ths of 1 degree. Don't miss this please, but remember you must have an absolutely clear, flat horizon. Now the next morning, Thursday the 6th, although Jupiter and Venus won't be quite as close they will still be eye-catching as will also be an even skinnier Moon also close to the horizon. However, the next day Friday the 7th, some not-so-good cosmic news especially if you happen to live in tidal areas because Friday the 7th's New Moon will be the closest New Moon of the entire year, 33,000 miles closer than the farthest New Moon in September and will bring very high tides due to the extra gravitational pull on our watery planet. So be forewarned. Two days later on Sunday the 9th, if you go outside after sunset you will see an exquisite 2 day old crescent moon floating eerily in the twilight. And if you look up and to its left you will see the planet it will visit the following evening. Indeed, on Monday night the 10th, the night before Mardi Gras, you will see an exquisite pairing of a 3 day old moon and the ringed planet Saturn. And if you have a small telescope and use at least 40 power, you will see Saturn's exquisite ring system. And if you also aim your telescope at the crescent moon, at the curved line that separates the night time part of the moon, what we call the terminator, you will see exquisite shadows climbing up mountainsides and falling down into craters. And as a consolation prize to those of you who missed the Venus/Jupiter pairing on the 5th, we have something you absolutely should be able to see Wednesday morning February 12th, at dawn, just before sunrise, because in just one week's time Jupiter will have glided up to meet Mercury while Mercury will have dipped down to meet Jupiter and thus they will appear side by side only one degree apart. What a great time for a planetary pairing. And now, just a word of thanks to all you viewers who have watched "Star Hustler" for more than 20 years, because this show marks the 1,000th episode. So once again, after the 999th time, may I remind you all to Keep Looking Up!



* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.



 


STAR HUSTLER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR HUSTLER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take a months worth of STAR HUSTLER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc.


As of this date, 1/24/97, Telstar 401, our regular satellite, is not functioning.

 

PBS has made temporary feed arrangements for this month's feed.

Monday January 27 9:30 - 10:00 AM EST

Telstar 402 Transponder 7-Upper Channel 1

 

For non-digital receivers use:

Telstar 402 Transponder 24 Frequency 11,923

 

Additional feed dates and satellite info will be provided when we get them.





Notice : These are rough drafts of the scripts for STAR HUSTLER. Changes may well be made as production requires.



STAR HUSTLER Episode #394-I

1001st Show


To Be Aired : Monday2/10/97 thru Sunday 2/16/97

"Comet of the Century? Update!".

Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings, fellow star gazers, and as I said 3 weeks ago, if you haven't done so already, now is absolutely the time to start your Comet Hale-Bopp watch because from the beginning of this week, February 10th to the 20th you will have no bright moonlight in the sky to wipe out the fainter light of the tail of Comet Hale-Bopp. And although as I write this episode experts are still disagreeing as to how bright Hale-Bopp will be during February, nevertheless most agree that its overall brightness should equal that of the brightest stars in the Big Dipper. And how bright it will get at its peak is still subject to debate. You see, back when Hale-Bopp was discovered in July of '95 the experts soon realized that this comet was hundreds of times brighter than Halley's Comet was at the same distance which means that Comet Hale-Bopp is intrinsically much larger than Halley's Comet, larger even than last year's wonderful Comet Hyakutake. And if Hale-Bopp could come as close to Earth as Hyakutake did it would indeed be brighter than any comet in the past 150 years. But unfortunately its closest approach will be over 100 million miles farther away than Hyakutake. But because it is so much bigger than Hyakutake it may still be even brighter. Here's how fast it is approaching us: On February 1st it was 185 million miles away from us. One week later, 175 million. This week, on Valentine's Day the 14th, it will be only 162 million miles away; on the 21st, 150 million and the last day of February, the 28th, 139 million; March 7th, 130; March 14th, 124; and March 22nd, at its closest, only 122 million miles away! So please start your viewing this week because you will able to watch it brighten night after night and hopefully watch its tail grow longer and longer. To see it at its optimum, from February 10th through February 20th, go out every morning between 5 and 5:30 A.M. and look East where you will see the 3 bright stars of the Summer Triangle. And from the 10th through the 20th you will be able to watch Hale-Bopp as it tracks right alongside our old friend Cygnus the Swan, whose tail star, Deneb, marks one corner of the triangle. To optimize viewing you must be as far away from any artificial lighting as possible. And to really see the tail change from day to day use a pair of binoculars. Indeed, if you've never owned a pair of binoculars before, now is the time to get a pair. My personal recommendation is a pair of 7 by 50 binoculars, and you don't need expensive ones, the cheapest ones will do. And while you're looking up at this flying cosmic iceberg with its several million mile long tail, keep in mind that the last time it visited us was 4200 years ago when the Great Pyramids were almost brand new. Oh what a different world Hale-Bopp will see this time around as it looks down on us as we Keep Looking Up!



* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.


This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.




STAR HUSTLER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR HUSTLER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take a months worth of STAR HUSTLER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc.

 


As of this date, 1/24/97, Telstar 401, our regular satellite, is not functioning.

 

PBS has made temporary feed arrangements for this month's feed.

Monday January 27 9:30 - 10:00 AM EST

Telstar 402 Transponder 7-Upper Channel 1

 

For non-digital receivers use:

Telstar 402 Transponder 24 Frequency 11,923

 

Additional feed dates and satellite info will be provided when we get them.



Notice : These are rough drafts of the scripts for STAR HUSTLER. Changes may well be made as production requires.


STAR HUSTLER Episode #395-I

1002nd Show


To Be Aired : Monday 2/1797 through Sunday 2/23/97

"Get Ready For The Rusty Dusty Planet Of The Year!"



Horkheimer: Greetings,greetings fellow star gazers and if you haven't started watching already, well now is the time to begin your regular watch of the best planet of the year, Mars, which is racing towards us as I speak and will reach its closest and brightest on St. Patrick's Day March 17th. Let me show you: OK, we've set our skies so that we're facing East around 9 pm any night through the end of this month where you'll see our old friend, Leo the Lion, climbing the eastern sky, being just a little higher each successive night at the same time. His head and mane marked by a sickle-shaped group of stars, his hind quarters marked by a right triangle. And just below his tail, which is the star called Denebola, you will see a brightish rouge-gold light which is the planet Mars. And if you look down and to the left of Mars you will see a similarly colored star Arcturus, and although most of the time Mars is much much dimmer than Arcturus, right now because Mars is racing towards us, it is significantly brighter and will continue to brighten all the way through St. Patrick's Day. In fact, from the first day of this month to St. Patrick's Day Mars will grow 275% brighter. And you'll actually be able to watch it brighten if you go out and look for it at least a couple of times a week. And because Mars is so very close right now if you have a small telescope you'll actually be able to see Mars' ice cap at its North Pole. And in case you're wondering what causes that reddish brown , rouge-gold color think of Mars as the rusty planet because it's the iron oxides in the Martian rocks and sand which gives Mars its distinctive hues. In fact, while our Earth is 70% covered with water and would look bluish-white through a small telescope on Mars, most of Mars is covered by great rocky deserts and humongous sand dunes so that when you look at Mars through a telescope on Earth the bright light areas are the vast areas of sand while the dark areas are the mountains, canyons and craters from which the winds have blown the sand away. In fact, at least 5 times in the past 150 years Mars has appeared absolutely featureless without any dark areas whatsoever whenever gigantic planet-wide sand and dust storms completely engulfed Mars and obscured every single surface feature from view. Indeed, as bad luck would have it, back in 1971 when we sent Mariner 9 to investigate Mars, just before it arrived Mars was caught up in a monstrous global sand storm which completely wiped out every surface feature from view and it was only after the storm let up, after 2 1/2 months of circling the planet that Mariner was finally able to see the Martian surface and discover its great grand canyon, now named The Valley of Mariner. So begin your Mars watch now because who knows whether or not a planet-wide dust storm will whip up between now and Mars' closest approach on St. Paddy's Day which is one more good reason to remember to Keep Looking Up!

* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.




STAR HUSTLER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR HUSTLER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take a months worth of STAR HUSTLER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc.


As of this date, 1/24/97, Telstar 401, our regular satellite, is not functioning.

 

PBS has made temporary feed arrangements for this month's feed.

Monday January 27 9:30 - 10:00 AM EST

Telstar 402 Transponder 7-Upper Channel 1

 

For non-digital receivers use:

Telstar 402 Transponder 24 Frequency 11,923

 

Additional feed dates and satellite info will be provided when we get them.

 


Notice : These are rough drafts of the scripts for STAR HUSTLER. Changes may well be made as production requires.


STAR HUSTLER Episode #396-I

1003rd Show Show


To Be Aired : Monday 2/24/97 through Sunday 3/2/97

"A Return Journey To Orion's Belt"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings, fellow star gazers, and I wish I had a dollar for every time someone asked me ,"What are the names of those three stars in the belt of Orion the Hunter?" Because their names are so rythmical and just so plain nifty sounding that once you hear them you just kinda like to say them. And since I haven't mentioned them by name for over two years let's not only do so now but let's also take a journey to these three wonders of the Great Hunter. To find them, for the next few weeks simply go outside just after it gets dark out and face South, where you'll easily find these 3 stars, equally spaced in a perfect row, the only 3 such equally spaced stars visible to the naked eye. In western civilization we see these three as the belt stars of the mythical Orion the Mighty Hunter, so naturally the 2 bright stars below them mark Orion's knees and the 2 bright stars above, his shoulders. Now the reason these three stars are my favorite stars of all to pronounce is because they sound so much like they came right out of American Indian folklore, although they are Arabic in origin. From left to right they are: Alnitak, Alnilam and Mintaka. I mean, doesn't that sound native American? Alnitak, Alnilam, Mintaka...like a line right out of Hiawatha? At any rate on many a night as a youngster I wished that I could just momentarily shut off gravity and fly faster than the speed of light to visit these three tantalizing beacons. Then later when I really got serious about the science of astronomy I discovered that in factual imagination I could. So let me take you on an imaginary but scientifically factual journey to these 3 wonders of winter nights. our first stop only 93 million miles away will be our own Sun which is a very average yellow star with a relatively cool surface temperature of 10 thousand degrees fahrenheit and a rather meager diameter, less than 1 million miles wide. Then from our Sun let's fly on the wings of the gods 12 hundred light years away to Alnilam, ther middle star of Orion's belt which burns a blue hot 51 thousand degrees fahrenheit and dwarfs our Sun because we could line up 16 of our Suns across its middle. Alnitak, on the other hand, is 100 light years farther beyond being 1300 light years away. And although only 9 times the diameter of our Sun, it burns an even hotter blue, 53 thousand degrees fahrenheit. The longest journey however, is to Mintaka, more than twice the distance from Earth as Alnitak or Alnilam, being 2400 light years away, but burning a bit cooler, at 45 thousand degrees and a bit smaller, only 6 1/2 times the size of our Sun. Alnitak , Alnilam, Mintaka. If we could line them up side by side with our Sun, their sizes and temperatures would make our star seem puny by comparison. Indeed, even my childhood flights of fancy couldn't come close to their reality and wonder which you can see for yourself if you just Keep Looking Up!
* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


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