STAR HUSTLER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR HUSTLER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take a months worth of STAR HUSTLER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc.



Satellite feed for August 1996 is as follows: The feed will be August 26 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.

Satellite feed for September 1996 is as follows: The feed will be September 30 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.

Satellite feed for October 1996 is as follows: The feed will be October 28 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR HUSTLER. Changes may well be made as production requires.


STAR HUSTLER Episode #371-I


978 th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 9/2/96 through Sunday 9/8/96

"A Hale-Bopp Update! And A Great Celestial Line-Up Reminder!"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings, fellow star gazers and as we told you just over a year ago, a great comet is on its way, getting ready to make its best appearance on April 1st, 1997. But it is so big and so bright that it is already visible to the naked eye if you have clear dark skies far away from city lights and know exactly where to look. Let me show you how to find it: OK, we've got our skies set up for 8 to 9 pm your local time any night this week. And if you look almost directly South you should see our old friend, the teapot-shaped portion of Sagittarius and directly above the teapot's pointed lid the outrageously bright and largest planet of our solar system, good old Jupiter. Then down to the right another old friend, the fish-hooked shaped constellation of Scorpius with the giant red star Antares marking its heart. Now we're going to use this bright red star Antares and the brilliant white planet Jupiter to find the much dimmer comet Hale-Bopp. You see if you draw a line between Jupiter and and Antares and then imagine two more lines almost as long forming a triangle on top of this line, and then if you look just to the left of the top, or apex of this triangle you should see a dim star-like object and that's comet Hale-Bopp. And to confirm that you've found it use a pair of binoculars which will reveal not only the head of Hale-Bopp but also a small distinct tail. And if you go out and look once or twice a week for the next couple of months you will notice that Hale-Bopp will slowly and steadily grow brighter. But you must have clear dark skies far away from city lights with no moonlight. And you'll see it better, of course, if you use binoculars or a small telescope. And we'll update you every few weeks from now through next April. Now one more reminder of the great celestial lineup next Monday morning September 9th, just before sunrise looking East. Indeed, you will see in an almost perfect lineup five celestial objects. Starting with the closest to the horizon, a slender sliver of a crescent moon; just above it brilliant Venus; above Venus a not-so-brilliant red planet Mars; and above Mars the two brother stars of Gemini the Twins, Pollux and Castor. And if you can, just for a moment, imagine space as being 3 dimensional which it really is, you will see on what a vast scale each one of these objects lies from planet Earth. For if we can use light as a measuring stick, knowing that light travels 186 thousand miles per second, the light we see from the Moon left it just over one second ago. The light from Venus left it 7 minutes ago and the reddish light from Mars 17 minutes. But Pollux is another story for its light will have taken 35 years to reach us. And the light  we see from its twin Castor, a twin in name only, left it half a century ago in 1946, just after the end of World War II. Oh, what a wonderful sky to wonder at if you remember to Keep Looking Up!



* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


STAR HUSTLER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR HUSTLER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take a months worth of STAR HUSTLER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc.



Satellite feed for August 1996 is as follows: The feed will be August 26 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.

Satellite feed for September 1996 is as follows: The feed will be September 30 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.

Satellite feed for October 1996 is as follows: The feed will be October 28 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR HUSTLER. Changes may well be made as production requires.


STAR HUSTLER Episode #372-I


979 th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 9/9/96 through Sunday 9/15/96

"Eclipse of the Harvest/Saturn Moon; And How To Watch It. Part 1"


Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings, fellow star gazers and mark Thursday evening, September 26th and early Friday morning, September 27th on your calendar as the last total eclipse of the moon over North America until the year 2000. For although Asia and part of Europe will enjoy a total lunar eclipse in 1997, most of you watching this show aren't going to experience a total lunar eclipse until all the years beginning with 19 are over. But just what is an eclipse? And what causes one? Well there's a lot of confusion about eclipses and the phases of the moon. You see, every month we're used to watching the moon go from a new nothing to a full something and back again to a new nothing with all the accompanying phases in between. Now most of us know that when the moon is new it is in the same part of the heavens where the sun is located so that although the moon is in the sky, it travels across the sky all day with the sun and the sun is so bright it wipes the moon out from view; so a new moon is always invisible. Most of us also know that whenever the moon is on the opposite side of the earth it is so situated that its face is completely lit up by the sun's rays and we call that a full moon. You see moonlight is nothing more than reflected sunlight. But every so often at time of new moon, the moon instead of riding just above, or just below the sun, passes directly in front of the sun in the daytime and covers it up. And when that happens we experience an eclipse of the sun. But if, during the time of full moon, when the moon is on the opposite side of the earth from the sun, if it rides not above or below the earth's shadow, but directly into the earth's shadow, the earth's shadow will block the sunlight bouncing off the moon and the moon will slowly grow dark, and we'll experience an eclipse of the moon. And that's what we're going to experience Thursday and Friday the 26th and 27th. Indeed, our moon will ride directly through the earth's dark shadow and for over 70 minutes will be in deep, dark eclipse. And almost everybody in North America, Mexico and South America will see it. Now although I'll give you eclipse times in Eastern Daylight Time, simply extrapolate for your own time zone. Partial eclipse begins at 9:12 pm Thursday night the 26th and for the next hour and seven minutes you will be able to watch the progress of the earth's curved shadow as it slowly covers the face of the moon. Total eclipse will begin at 10:19 pm, mid or darkest part of the eclipse will be at 10:54 pm and total eclipse will end at 11:29. Then for the next hour and seven minutes until 12:36 am you will be able to watch the moon as it slowly slides out of the earth's circular shadow and reveals itself once again as a full harvest moon. But this eclipse of the Harvest/ Saturn moon has two special added attractions: Planet Saturn being number one and an eclipse contest being number two. And anyone who sees this eclipse can play. More about that next week. In the meantime remember to Keep Looking Up!



* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


STAR HUSTLER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR HUSTLER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take a months worth of STAR HUSTLER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc.



Satellite feed for August 1996 is as follows: The feed will be August 26 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.

Satellite feed for September 1996 is as follows: The feed will be September 30 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.

Satellite feed for October 1996 is as follows: The feed will be October 28 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR HUSTLER. Changes may well be made as production requires.


STAR HUSTLER Episode #373-I


980th Show

To Be Aired : Monday 9/16/96 through Sunday 9/22/96

"Eclipse of the Harvest/Saturn Moon
And How To Win A Telescope Just By Watching. Part II"



Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and once again let me remind you to mark Thursday evening, September 26th and Friday morning September 27th as the night of the last total lunar eclipse for North America until the year 2000. And as I said last week, this eclipse has a couple of extra added attractions, one of which is that it occurs on the night of the Harvest Moon which is always the full moon closest to the Autumnal Equinox, the first day of Autumn, which will have occurred only 4 days earlier on September 22nd in addition to which 2 hours before eclipse time the ringed planet Saturn will come into opposition and will thus ride across the sky in the company of the moon all night long before, during and after total eclipse. And finally if you keep track of this eclipse's progress and make note of its color and brightness you will have an opportunity to win a telescope. But first, once again, let me give you the exact eclipse times, all in Eastern Daylight Time; extrapolate for your own time zone, keeping in mind that the farther west you live in North America, the less of the eclipse you will see. OK, from 9:12 p.m. until 10:19 p.m. you'll be able to watch the moon as it is slowly covered by the darkest part of the earth's shadow, the umbra. And you'll clearly see the curvature of the earth's shadow on the face of the moon itself, which was used over 2,000 years ago by Aristotle, as one of his proofs that the earth was round. Then from 10:19 'til 11:29 the moon will be totally eclipsed. And from 11:29 p.m. to 12:36 a.m. the moon will slowly move out of the earth's shadow and brighten back into a full harvest moon. Now just as no two people are exactly alike, so too are no two eclipses alike especially when it comes to color and brightness. Eclipses can range all the way from light copper to orange to blood red, from shades of gray/brown with bright rims to jet black. It all depends upon the amount of dust in our earth's atmosphere. And we want you to record the brightness and color of this eclipse at its deepest point which is mid-eclipse, roughly 11:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time or your local equivalent. Send your results to: " Star Hustler" Eclipse, P.O. Box 2, Miami, FL 33261 and we'll have a drawing for a telescope. You can use the standard Danjon Luminosity scale which reads from L-0 to L-4. L-0 is an extremely dark, almost invisible, eclipse; L-1 is a dark eclipse with gray or brownish coloration. L-2 is a deep red or rust colored center with a relatively bright outer rim. L-3 is a brick red center with a bright or yellow rim. And L-4 is a very bright copper-red or orange center with a very bright bluish rim. And don't forget this eclipse is especially special because the brilliant planet Saturn will ride across the sky with the moon all night long. Indeed, through a small telescope Saturn and the eclipsed moon will provide a super sight! So, have a happy eclipse of the Harvest/Saturn moon and who knows, you may even win a telescope if you just Keep Looking Up!

* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.

STAR HUSTLER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR HUSTLER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take a months worth of STAR HUSTLER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc.



Satellite feed for August 1996 is as follows: The feed will be August 26 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.

Satellite feed for September 1996 is as follows: The feed will be September 30 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.

Satellite feed for October 1996 is as follows: The feed will be October 28 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR HUSTLER. Changes may well be made as production requires.


STAR HUSTLER Episode #374-I


981st Show

To Be Aired : Monday 9/23/96 through Sunday 9/29/96

"Saturn At Opposition/ An Eclipse Reminder;
And The Loneliest Star In Heaven"



Horkheimer: Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and as you regular viewers know, this is the week of the spectacular Harvest Moon/Saturn eclipse. Indeed, this Thursday evening, and Friday morning, September 26th and 27th North America will experience the last total lunar eclipse until the year 2000. Now partial eclipse begins at 9:12 p.m., E.D.T. when the moon starts its ride into the earth's shadow. At 10:19 p.m. the total eclipse commences when the moon will remain in darkness for over an hour until 11:29 p.m. , after which the moon will slowly ride out of the earth's shadow and turn back into a bright Harvest Moon at 12:36 a.m. All times are Eastern Daylight, simply extrapolate for your own time zone. Now if you notice something bright riding across the sky along side the eclipsed moon don't be surprised because the bright ringed planet Saturn will attend the moon all night long. In fact, not since 1968 has an eclipsed moon glided across the sky with a bright companion beside it, and back then it was a much dimmer companion, the star Spica in Virgo the Virgin. In fact, we could say that this night of the upcoming Harvest Moon eclipse is the official opening of the Saturn season because on this night Saturn comes into opposition which means that it will be in the sky all night long from sunrise to sunset for the next few weeks. Don't miss this please because it'll be a long, long time before you'll ever see an eclipsed moon ride across the heavens with a brilliant planet in tow. And if you have a small telescope, take a look at Saturn now because although back on February 11th the rings of Saturn disappeared when they presented themselves edge on to us, by now they have opened up in such a way that through a small telescope they appear almost three dimensional. And while you're out there you might want to look for what some people call the loneliest star in the heavens. Its name is Fomalhaut and in Arabic it means the mouth of the fish. Now although Saturn is in the constellation Pisces, the Fish, Fomalhaut is in the constellation Piscis Austrinus, the Southern Fish and it appears in a part of the heavens that has very few bright stars, thus its nickname, the lonely or solitary one. An easy way to find it on eclipse night is to use Saturn during the darkest part of the eclipse, which is around 11:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time because then Fomalhaut will be due South. To make sure you've found it, face Saturn, then measure 3 fists away to the right of it and there you'll find this friendless star. In fact, one writer wrote of this star at the beginning of this century, "On early acquaintance the loneliness of this star, added to the somber signs of approaching Autumn, sometimes gives one a touch of melancholy." At any rate, this week, the night of the Harvest/Moon Saturn Eclipse, notice how much brighter Saturn and Fomalhaut will appear during totality than they do at either the beginning or end of the eclipse. Oh what a great week to Keep Looking Up!

* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


STAR HUSTLER
THE INTERNATIONAL EDITION




STAR HUSTLER is seen nationally on most PBS stations. If it is not currently on your PBS station we suggest you contact your local PBS programming director and let them know it is available free to all PBS stations. You may take a months worth of STAR HUSTLER off satellite for personal use, classroom use, astronomy club use, etc.



Satellite feed for August 1996 is as follows: The feed will be August 26 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.

Satellite feed for September 1996 is as follows: The feed will be September 30 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.

Satellite feed for October 1996 is as follows: The feed will be October 28 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on Telstar 401, transponder 7-U.


Notice : These are working drafts of the scripts for STAR HUSTLER. Changes may well be made as production requires.


STAR HUSTLER Episode #375-I


982nd Show

To Be Aired : Monday 9/30/96 through Sunday 10/6/96

"A Star Hustler Classic : Season Without Giants, or,
Time of the Quiet Sky"



Greetings, greetings fellow star gazers and if you're one of those people who loves the change of the seasons, have you ever wondered whether the sky changes seasons too? If so, then don't touch that dial because in this episode I'll let you in on some of the secrets of the seasons and how you can double up your pleasure not only by watching the face of the earth change season, but also by watching the face of the night sky likewise metamorphose. You see it all has to do with our Earth's yearly journey in its orbit around the Sun because as our Earth makes its annual journey around the Sun it faces a different part of the starry sky each successive evening so that is you go outside every night after sunset for a year you will notice that the various constellations slowly but regularly change their positions in the heavens being sometimes very prominent and high up in early evening and at other times completely gone from the heavens. Now when astronomers talk about sky seasons they mean that the particular star patterns or constellations of any season are those that are very high above the horizon in early evening hours during a given season. For instance, in summer time we know that the great Summer Triangle and the giant Scorpion are always very high and dominant in early evening summer skies. And in winter, in early evening, the giant Orion and his dog always ride high and dominate winter's landscape. Springtime always has its wonderful Leo the Lion and the Big Dipper towering overhead in early evening; but there is one season when the sky becomes quiet... a season when there are fewer bright stars visible than at any other time of year and, quite appropriately I think that season is Autumn, the season when the Earth too is quieting down. A season of muted sun and muted starlight, a season without celestial giants; the season of the soft sky. And if you do what I'm about to show you on at least one October evening every October for the rest of your life, you will add yet another dimension to your enjoyment of the exquisite feelings that Autumn brings. Simply go outside any October evening just after the Sun has gone down and look for the giant summer scorpion as he sets low in the southwest. Then in the hours before midnight you will see for yourself the softest of skies with a minimum of bright stars, a time when you'll be able to delight in the exquisite beauty of the Seven Sisters rising. Then, around midnight the autumn season's skies will slowly give way to a preview of winter as Orion, the winter giant, boldly rises in the southeast. How fitting. How poetic that the sky seasons coincidentally match our Earth's as regular as clock work. Yes, every October of your life summer's Scorpion will set at sunset and winter's Orion will rise at midnight. And the hours in between will be the palettes of a celestial impressionist. So get thee outside under the heavens softly and remember to Keep Looking Up!


* This week's Sky At A Glance and Planet Roundup from Sky & Telescope.

This week's Sky At A Glance displays current week only.


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